Gresley Abas Strategic Plan

With the benefit of DRG’s research and insight, the client is now clear about the type of business they want to be in and the best opportunities to pursue.

The situation

The distinctive approach of DRG’s client, an architectural practice established in 2004, has seen them grow significantly in a brief time. Sustainability is central to all the practice’s designs, along with architecture’s unique contribution to culture and the environment.

The practice has 14 staff, who have mastered the art of client service – as attested by their clients’ glowing endorsements.

In the enviable position of having many opportunities for growth, the client needed to resolve which areas of expertise to pursue.

Though service-oriented architects par excellence, certain practice management issues needed to be addressed to support their growth plans.

Lastly, to compete for larger tenders, the client needed to expand and re-define their project management capacity.

working with drg

DRG’s approach was multi-phase:

First, one-on-one interviews were conducted with 17 key stakeholders. Questions about the client’s performance and growth opportunities were posed in these interviews.

Secondary research analysed market opportunities for architects in Western Australia, and findings informed the firm about markets that were likely to yield the best returns.

Research into the perception of the practice’s brand investigated such areas as client loyalty, and clients’ views of and feelings about the firm. This research aimed to ensure any future brand-building was based on real client feedback.

DRG's work, along with extensive consultation with the client, culminated in a strategic business plan. The plan outlined key future markets and the implications of these for the firm’s direction and service offerings. The plan mapped out a step-by-step blueprint for growth.

the results

With the benefit of DRG's research and insight, the client is now clear about the type of business they want to be in and the best opportunities to pursue. Such clarity will also inform the areas of expertise of architects and designers they employ in the future.

It was also made clear that a practice manager was required to oversee certain business and administrative areas. This appointment has been a success, allowing the architects to devote themselves more fully to their work.

Finally, the client has more confidence about the services that the market is most likely to embrace.